Thursday, May 24, 2012

Women Blogging on Math

Dan Meyer is doing a cool project called 101 Questions. It's not something that grabs me personally, but I think it will help lots of students connect to math. Elizabeth wondered why so many more men have posted videos and photos to the 101 Questions site (101qs.com) than women. Dan posted her question and asked for our thoughts - we're up to 48 responses. (One fascinating comment compared the site to video arcade games, and mentioned research that documents their greater appeal to boys.)

Someone hypothesized that there are lots more male math bloggers. Although that may be true, I know of many great math blogs by women, and offered to post a list. What I've compiled below comes from my Google Reader. If you know of any others (including your own!), please add them in the comments. I'll edit the list to include any that I like. As I perused my list, I noticed that the blog lists people include on their blogs often reflect their own gender. (There are substantially more women authors than men in my soon-to-be-published book, Playing With Math: Stories from Math Circles, Homeschoolers, and the Internet, so women definitely speak to me and my concerns.)

[Note: I've edited this a bunch since posting it. Good thing school is over, so I can explore new blogs.]

High School & College Level



Math for Little Ones
Also, if you're interested in math for young kids, check out two email groups: Living Math Forum and Natural Math.



On Hiatus (great content in the archives)



Others
  • Bridging Differences (Diane Ravitch and Deborah Meier discuss education politics)
  • Intersections (JoAnne Growney, Poetry with Mathematics)
  • Math Playground (Colleen King runs a great math games site)
  • mathbabe (Cathy O'Neil, financial analyst & mathematician)
  • The Rookery (Michelle Martin, notes on a progressive 4th/5th classroom, some math)
  • Unschool Days (Holly writes mostly about teaching science in a home-based setting)

18 comments:

  1. Add to that list Anna Weltman's new blog, "Recipes for Pi."

    http://recipesforpi.wordpress.com/

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  2. Great list, Sue. I also follow (no particular order & I'm sure missing people)
    Mimi Yang http://untilnextstop.blogspot.de/, Lisa Henry http://oldmathdognewtricks.blogspot.com/, Liz Durkin http://eadurkin.wordpress.com, Malke Rosenberg http://mathinyourfeet.blogspot.com, and Grace Chen http://educating-grace.blogspot.com

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  3. OMG, I love Malke's blog, how did that escape my careful working down my list?!

    And here's one I just now discovered: http://hanamath.posterous.com/ (Sadie Estrella)

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  4. I'm surprised there isn't more overlap on our lists, Sue.

    Here's mine: http://betweenthenumbers.wordpress.com/2012/05/24/strong-women-proud-women/

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  5. It'll be fun to check out the ones on your list that I haven't seen yet. I'll add a bunch to mine, I'm sure.

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  6. I'd like to add my colleague as well, Sarah Phillips to the list. http://mssphillips.wordpress.com/ (@mssphillips) on Twitter.

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  7. Thanks for including me! I'll have to do some writing this weekend, lots has been happening with too little time for reflection. We are winding down though.

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  8. "Mess or Math" (by a high school math student)
    http://messormath.wordpress.com/

    "Learning Curves" (by a math PhD currently working in a research organization affiliated with the university where she used to be on the faculty)
    http://learningcurves.blogspot.com/

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  9. Excellent list. Some more that I know via mathblogging.org (shameless self-plug ;)):

    Izabella Laba The Accidental Mathematician

    Claire Mathieu, A CS Prof Blog

    Laura McLay, Punk rock OR

    Catarina Duthil Novaes M-Phi


    Haggis the sheep Knot your average sheep

    Clara Grima seispalabras

    JoAnne Growney Intersections, Poetry & Mathematics


    Katie Steckles at The Aperiodical

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  10. I was going to add Anna Weltman but Paul Salomon beat me to it (and she's also on betweenthenumbers' list).

    Also, Erlina Ronda.

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  11. Thank you so much! I'll add these to my reader right away.

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  12. Sue, great list!

    I went through my rather long RSS list and found some more:

    Caroline Mukisa MathsInsider MathFour

    Laura Laing Math for Grownups

    Grace Educating Grace

    Breedeen The Space Between the Numbers

    Erlina Ronda Mathematics for Teaching

    Gisele Glosser Math Goodies Blog

    Colleen Young Mathematics, Learning and Web 2.0

    Denise Let's Play Math!

    Maria Miller Homeschool Math Blog

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  13. Sue & Bree,

    Great minds DO think alike. I suggested two more on Bree's site: Carole Fullerton’s http://mindfull.wordpress.com/ and http://numberloving.com/ by Sharon Derbyshire & Laura Rees-Hughes

    Chris

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  14. Thank you for the list Sue. I've got to look at these later.

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  15. One more to add:
    Coefficents of Determination
    http://coefficientsofdeterminations.blogspot.com/
    @aeakland

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  16. Hi Sue,

    Shecky from the Math Frolic blog pointed me to this article since he knows I've been having a tough time finding women to interview for my "Inspired by Math" podcast series. But, I no longer have a shortage, thanks to your awesome list and to other blogs mentioned in the comments.

    While I've got your attention, would you be interested in being on my podcast series? It would be great to talk about your book as well, which I don't believe it out yet, right?

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  17. Not out yet. Coming soon. Sure, I'd be delighted to do a podcast with you. Email me: math anthology editor (no spaces) on gmail. I would also recommend that you interview Maria Droujkova. There are a number of women and people of color doing great math education things who don't blog. I might be able to recommend a few others to you.

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  18. Great. I'll email you about the podcast. Maria and I are recording an interview this Friday. And, yes, I'd love to know of people who aren't so well known who are doing great math education. Thanks.

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